Advanced Placement Accountabaloney

Florida prides itself in the number of Advanced Placement courses its high school students take. Is it too much of a good thing? Are decisions being made in the best interest of each student? If you live in Floriduh, you will not be surprised to learn that when you follow the money, you find a bunch of accountabaloney.


In February 2016, the Florida Department of Education celebrated Florida’s position   as  second in the nation for the percentage of 2015 Florida high school graduates taking an Advanced Placement (AP) exam while in high school and third place for the percentage of 2015 high school graduates potentially earning college credit by scoring a 3 or higher on an AP exam.

Other highlights included:

  • 57.7 percent of Florida 2015 graduates took an AP exam during high school, exceeding  the national average (37.3 percent)
  • Over the last decade, the number of Florida graduates participating in AP more than doubled, increasing from 40,276 students in 2005 to 86,400 students in 2015, an increase of 115 percent.
  • Florida ranks third in the nation for the percentage of 2015 graduates who potentially earned college credit by scoring a 3 or higher on AP exams (30.7 percent, higher than the national average of 22.4%).
  • Over time, increasing numbers of Hispanic, African American and low income students are taking and passing Advanced Placement courses/tests.

The increasing numbers of successful Advanced Placement participants is certainly the result of an accountability system that rewards participation in Advanced Placement Courses.

Beginning in 2010, Florida adjusted it’s school grade formula to reward (first) participation and (now) performance on Advanced Placement assessments. Currently, up to 10% of a High School’s grade is based on the percentage of graduates who earned a score on an acceleration examination (a level 3 or higher on an Advanced Placement exam), a “C” or better in a dual enrollment course, or earned an industry certification. For the purpose of calculating this rate, a student is counted no more than once in the numerator and denominator. Students who pass more than one AP course (or dual enrollment course or industry certification) do not earn any extra points in the school grade calculation.

The College Board, who created and administers Advanced Placement exams, has frequently reported that students who are successful in AP exams are more likely to graduate college. From Florida’s current school grades report, it appears that the current  system has been successful in providing at least some accelerated courses (either AP, IB, AICE, dual enrollment or industry certification) for all of Florida’s high school students.

If passing one AP exam is good, is passing more exams better? Anyone with a child in Florida’s high schools today knows that students are being pressured to take increasing numbers of AP courses, resulting in some students taking as many as 10, 15 or more AP courses during their high school career. How many is too many?

Jay Matthews, who covered college admissions for The Washington Post for more than two decades, wrote, in an article titled “Why We Wrongly Freak Out Over AP”:

“I have interviewed scores of college admissions officers and read the briefing materials of hundreds of colleges. Not one has ever said that adding an Advanced Placement class can make or break one’s chances of getting in.

Selective colleges want to see applicants take the most challenging courses at their high schools. In most cases, particularly in the Washington region, that means AP, International Baccalaureate or the Advanced International Certificate of Education. Selective colleges also like to see three to five AP courses, with good scores on the tests to show that the student is ready for college work. That can be accomplished by taking one AP course sophomore year, one or two in the junior year and one or two in the senior year — not an overwhelming burden for any student with a shot at a selective college.

Taking six, seven, eight or 20 AP courses will almost never make you more attractive to those colleges that reject more students than they accept. Your chances with them depend on your SAT or ACT scores, the depth of your extracurricular activities, the warmth of your teacher recommendations and your grade-point average compared with other students at your school applying to the same college.”

High School students, bogged down by excessive numbers of AP courses each year, may find little time to delve into extracurricular activities, participate in character building community service or, frankly, enjoy their life. While college admissions officers may recommend 4 or 5 AP classes TOTAL, in many Florida high schools it is not uncommon to find students taking 3 or 4 (or more) AP courses A YEAR. The stress of an excessive number of AP courses may be more than a high school student can, or should, be expected to handle as illustrated in this New York Times video Op-ed entitled “Advanced Pressure.”

Please take 5 minutes to watch this New York Times Op-Ed documentary, where filmmaker Vicki Abeles “features the stories of students and teachers of Advanced Placement classes and the pressures they face in our achievement-obsessed culture”:   http://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/1247466680941/op-ed-advanced-pressure.html

 

“What are we doing to our kids when we put them through this system that doesn’t allow them get enough sleep and causes them to be ramped up and stressed out?” -Jay Chugh, Teacher, Lafayette, CA.

Once heralded as essential to a rigorous high school education, Advanced Placement courses are now being questioned as “too rigid” and even eliminated by elite private schools. John Tierney, writing for The Atlantic, suggests how, though they may have initially been developed with good intentions,  somewhere along the line AP courses appear to have become corrupted by corporate profits (at $89 per test, the College Board earns over half of all its revenues from its Advanced Placement program — more than all its other revenue streams (SATs, SAT subject tests, PSATs) combined). Mr. Tierney states that AP courses are NOT equivalent to college courses, that claims of saving money in college are overstated, and that the push to increase enrollment has resulted in students who are marginally prepared for the rigors of an AP course diluting the experience for students who might be well placed in such courses. His greatest criticism is the effect of the AP curriculum on creativity and free thought:

“To me, the most serious count against Advanced Placement courses is that the AP curriculum leads to rigid stultification — a kind of mindless genuflection to a prescribed plan of study that squelches creativity and free inquiry. The courses cover too much material and do so too quickly and superficially. In short, AP courses are a forced march through a preordained subject, leaving no time for a high-school teacher to take her or his students down some path of mutual interest. The AP classroom is where intellectual curiosity goes to die.”

The death of intellectual curiosity should concern everyone. A recent article in Psychology Today, looked at the relationship of college grade point average (GPA) and creativity, noting an inverse relationship between students’ reported GPA and their orientation toward creative or innovative work.  The higher a student’s GPA, the lower was the students’ interest in innovation. In addition, the article sounded the alarm regarding the effect our current test focused education may have on future innovation: “In the United States, as our schools have moved increasingly toward an almost exclusive emphasis on test performance, creative thinking, objectively measured, has been declining at every grade level.”

Since the advent of No Child Left Behind, parents have become increasingly concerned with the loss of creative, authentic experiences in the classroom, pushed out by increasing levels of test preparation for high stakes standardized testing. Rather than developing “the whole child” with art, music and other creative programing, students are spending more and more time focused on and preparing for tests. In such an environment, should Advanced Placement courses be considered just more “teaching to the test”? Is that what our students need?

At the end of the “Advanced Pressure” documentary, high school teacher, Jay Chugh, suggests a solution: “The best thing to do would be to get rid of the AP program and just design a course that prepares students for the college experience.” Ahhh, such a system used to exist, and in some instances still does, and it was called “honors courses.” Of course, in Florida, students who pass honors courses do NOT count in the “College and Career Acceleration” category of the School Grading system. Also, if students abandoned AP courses for equal rigorous honors courses, the FLDOE might no longer have national bragging rights. Perhaps the biggest obstacle to returning to more honors classes in Florida’s public high schools, would be the lost incentive funding paid to the schools and teachers.

F.S. 1011.62 (n) provides financial incentives to schools depending on the numbers of level 3 and higher scores students earn on AP exams. For each student who earns a 3 or higher on an AP test, the district receives 0.16 of an FTE (Full time equivalent/per pupil spending). Currently this calculates to approximately $1,000 per successful AP score. If students are able to pass multiple AP tests each year, the amount can quickly add up.  Districts are required to allocate at least 80% of those funds to the high school whose student generated the funds. Teachers of Advanced Placement courses are also rewarded $50 for each of their students that pass the AP test with a score of 3 or higher, up to $2,000 per teacher each year.  Extra incentives are available for teachers in “D” or “F” schools, who will receive an additional $500 if just one student passes the AP test. [Similar financial incentives for schools offering International Baccalaureate programs/exams are outlined in F.S.1011.62(l).]

Last year, Monroe County increased the financial incentives for AP participation in their schools when it joined in partnership with the National Math and Science Initiative, another profit generating (net profit of $7 million in 2014) non-profit, which has the goal of increasing successful participation in specific STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) and AP Literature courses. Despite concerns that the “STEM crisis” might be a myth, Monroe County School District entered into a 3 year, almost $2 million, contract with NMSI, who lists the College Board as a partner and “funder.” Everytime NMSI is successful in increasing participation in AP courses, its partner, College Board, increases revenue. In addition to providing aggressive (much needed Monroe County) professional development programs for AP instructors, the NMSI program rewards students, teachers and administrators for successful AP test scores. Such funds are in addition to the previously described FS 1011.62(n) bonus funding.

NMSI Awards and Incentives

Given these financial incentives, it is difficult to imagine that schools might scale back on AP courses in pursuit of a more balanced education experience for students. When administrators receive bonuses based on AP scores, will they work to increase dual enrollment or honors participation? Not likely. Monroe County AP teachers could earn more than  $6,500 annually if 30 of their AP students score a 3 or higher. Would these teachers be willing to give that up to teach an honors class?
Florida’s test based accountability system is designed to encourage participation in Advanced Placement and other acceleration programs. A 2009 OPPAGA Report (Report No. 09-12) showed the incentive funding for AP courses exceeded the required program costs by more than $30 million annually. With increasing AP enrollment and, therefore, increasing costs, the OPPAGA study recommended reducing the level of incentive funding, but little legislative action was taken.  The incentive programs and school grades system are to be designed to encourage (push) more and more students into AP courses, without regard to any potentially negative impact on the students’ unique education needs.
So when it comes to Advanced Placement in Florida’s high schools, the winners are:
  • The College Board, with profits of $62 MILLION annually.
  • The FLDOE, with national bragging rights regarding AP participation AND the ability to deflect attention from declining SAT and ACT scores.
  • Districts, high schools and teachers, who receive bonus funding.
  • National Math Science Initiative, ready to expand across the state.
The losers? Overstressed high school students, curiosity and innovation and those who value an authentic education experience.
Expensive programming that benefits everyone’s bottom line, while underserving the educational needs of the students, is more evidence of Florida’s failed accountability system. It is time to reign in the overemphasis of Advanced Placement coursework in our classrooms. Schools should be offering students the courses that best fit their individual interests and needs and not the courses that provide the biggest bonuses.

Public Comment on ESSA: We Need a REAL Accountability Overhaul

“Don’t cling to a mistake just because you spent a lot of time making it.”   -Unknown

In December 2015, Congress passed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), replacing No Child Left Behind, which had been in place since 2002.  The ESSA purports to allow states greater flexibility for the design of their education accountability system, which is great news for us because we have been calling for a complete overhaul of Florida’s accountabaloney system since day 1 of this blog! We hope Florida can rise to the occasion and take full advantage of this opportunity to address our deeply flawed accountability system.

Some states appear to be rising to the challenge. Kentucky Commissioner of Education Stephen Pruitt advises a system that focuses on students:

“If we don’t come out with an accountability system focused on students, then we’ve failed. It can’t be about adults chasing points. The system needs to promote what’s best for students.” -Kentucky Commissioner of Education Stephen Pruitt 4/17/16

If Florida isn’t careful, Kentucky may become the leader in education accountability! They certainly appear to be headed in the right direction (which is away from the adults chasing points to ratify the A-F school grade system). Good for Kentucky!

Floridians are waking up to the realities of the system. Florida’s students are not well served by a high stakes test focused system, as recently explained by the Sun Sentinel Editorial Board:

“A major part of the problem, as we have written before, has been the use of the high-stakes tests for purposes to which they are unsuited. Those include school grades and teacher evaluations. Legislatures and governors with a stick-it-to-public-education attitude have hurt teacher morale, recruitment and retention, exacerbating the situation…

The “reformers” have now become the entrenched special interests. They want more of the same. Floridians should want better.”

These are all wise words and Florida’s Department of Education and legislature should heed them.  On June, 21, 2016, one day after it was promised, the FLDOE opened a website for public comment on changes to the Education Accountability system and ESSA. We invite all Florida citizens to comment on Florida’s current accountabaloney system and demand change. Sadly, if you are going to do so using the new website, you might need a law degree. It is just that convoluted. There are nine individual surveys and each one asks you to comment on specific portions of the ESSA legislation or draft regulations. Even the Florida Association of School Superintendents (FADSS) complained at today’s State Board of Education meeting, asking for a more authentic voice than an online opportunity. (You can watch here around 1:48:00). They demanded that stakeholders have a real voice in the process.

A real voice in the process will be difficult given the convoluted website. Here is what I did: I wrote up a list of my demands, copied it and pasted it into every comment box on each of the one surveys. I asked the FLDOE to determine which part of my demands corresponded to the confusing question they were asking. You might want to try a similar plan (you can copy my list if it suits you), but please let your voice be heard.

What should you ask for?

First, remind the FLDOE of “the original intent of ESEA, which was to facilitate equitable, thriving, and successful public education for all schools via distribution of funding free of strings attached other than need and a comprehensive and viable game plan for success.”

Demand a complete accountability overhaul: eliminate high stakes attached to state testing, minimize state standardized tests to those mandated by ESSA, return classroom assessments to teachers, utilizing primarily locally-based, teacher-controlled assessments, protect student data and make student data privacy a top priority.

  • Eliminate high stakes attached to state testing. It is the stakes attached to the tests that have, more than anything else, corrupted the education system.
    • End the mandatory 3rd grade promotion requirement as well as the graduation requirement to pass the Algebra 1 EOC and 10th grade FSA-ELA . These are not required by federal law or regulations. Many states already have eliminated their test dependent graduation requirements.
    • Dramatically reduce or eliminate the weight of the state EOC exams on the students final grade, from 30% to 10% or less.
    • Stop the use of VAM and test scores to evaluate teachers. ESSA eliminated any federal mandate for test-based teacher evaluation.
    • Test scores should make up no more than 51% of the total points in the A-F School Grade formula  (the minimum percentage allowed under ESSA).
    • Ensure that School Grades are used to identify schools in need of assistance (including additional funding) and not to punish schools identified as “low performers.” ESSA does require states to rank all schools and act to improve the lowest performing, but it no longer specifies the types of interventions required.
  • There should be no state standardized tests beyond those mandated by ESSA (reading and math in grades 3-8 and once in high school, science once in elementary, middle and high school). 
    • Minimize required state standardized tests to those mandated by ESSA. In Florida the Biology EOC and Algebra 1 EOC, along with the 10th grade FSA ELA could satisfy the high school requirements. The 9th grade FSA-ELA and all other state mandated EOCs could be eliminated.
    • The state should advocate for pilot programs allowing grade span testing or sampling in place of current ESSA mandates.
    • State should forbid standardized local interim, benchmark, predictive, formative, or other such tests, including those embedded in commercial on-line curricula. Eliminate all test data reporting requirements beyond the ESSA mandated assessments.
    • Institute a ban on standardized testing in pre-K through grade 3.
    • End the secrecy around state mandated assessments. Allow educators and parents to view and review state assessments.
  • Return classroom assessments to teachers, utilizing primarily locally-based, teacher-controlled assessments, such as projects and portfolios. The New York Performance Standards Consortium has demonstrated better outcomes with fewer standardized test, and should serve as a guide.
  • Protect student data and make student data privacy a top priority.
    • Eliminate digital classroom mandates, allowing districts to incorporate technology as a tool rather than a curriculum replacement.
    • Allow parents the option to safeguard their child’s data by allowing families to opt out of digital instruction.
    • The computer based, state mandated Civics exams allows the possibility of collection and sharing of sensitive data of a political nature.  In order to ensure the safety of such sensitive information, this exam, especially, should be paper based.

We encourage everyone to comment on the Commissioner’s site. Send copies of your comments to your state representatives, as well. It is time to overhaul this disaster. It is time to stop clinging to this mistake.


P.S. We are under no illusion that Florida will actually use this opportunity to eliminate mandatory 3rd grade retention, test based graduation requirements or the rank and punishment of schools based almost solely on student test scores, restoring teacher autonomy in the classrooms and local control to  our elected school boards. In fact, we are pretty sure the passage of ESSA was designed to open the flood gates towards further privatization of public schools and the profit generating, data sharing Competency Based Education (CBE). CBE is meant to convert public schools into data mining computer centers, where teachers are mere facilitators and massive profits are made for investors.

We agree with Peggy Robertson, that ESSA is not an opportunity to save public schools but rather the law that will hasten its demise.  Here, she points out the irony:

“And the passage of ESSA means that the end of year test eventually could become passé.  ESSA is pushing for online, daily testing – testing that is embedded inside online curriculum.  Children will now be subjected to online modules in which they must master something before moving on to the next online module.  It might be called personalized learning, mastery learning, proficiency-based testing, competency-based education, innovative assessments, and more. ESSA is pushing for these online assessment systems, as is ALEC, and the many foundations and organizations that are hoping to cash in.

As Stephen Krashen states: Competency-based education is not just a testing program.  It is a radical and expensive innovation that replaces regular instruction with computer “modules” that students work through on their own. It is limited to what can be easily taught and tested by computer, and is being pushed by computer and publishing companies that will make substantial profits from it. “

Why do I get the overwhelming sense that Florida’s accountability plan will lead us further down the path of the profiteers and CBE? Because this is Jeb’s mistake and they will cling to it until we vote the reformers out of office.

CBE has already infiltrated our schools. Nearly every one of Florida’s public school children have already used CBE programs (like iReady, iStation and Achieve 3000) and some districts are moving towards complete conversion to CBE within the next 5 years via a recently approved pilot study. Notice how “the Jeb Bush-founded Foundation for Florida’s Future — which lobbied for the program — praised the Legislature for approving” the CBE Pilot Study bill.

What can we do to save our public schools? We must educate other parents, school boards and communities about the inherent dangers in ESSA and CBE (share this video demonstrating the $270 million “pretendathon” happening in Baltimore, don’t let this happen to your district!).  It is time to refuse online curriculum and other online programs that are being used to cash in on our starving public schools and our children. And, by all means, VOTE THE REFORMERS OUT.

Was HB7069 Just Another VAM Scam?

When parents complain about over-testing, local school board members often advise them to write to their legislators. When similar concerns are brought to the Florida Department of Education (FLDOE), parents are told “these are local decisions.” Which is it?

In April 2015, following a year where parents had loudly expressed their displeasure with the explosion of testing in public schools and the new Florida State Assessment (FSA) had a disastrous roll out, HB 7069, “An act relating to education accountability” was signed into law and immediately went into effect.

HB 7069 promised to (among other things):

  • reduce “state and local assessment requirements, including those commonly associated with progress monitoring.”
  • “eliminate prescriptive remediation and progress monitoring requirements for low-performing students and provide for targeted instructional support in reading in K-3 students.”
  • grant “districts greater flexibility in measuring student performance in courses not associated with statewide, standardized assessments and in evaluating instructional personnel and school administrators”

With such lofty aspirations, why haven’t we seen a reduction in progress monitoring, remediation and testing, in general, in the classrooms?

Reduction of Progress Monitoring:

Much of the overall testing in the classroom comes in the form of “progress monitoring”: assessments designed to quantify a child’s progress, often used to predict performance on upcoming state testing. I like to call these “the test that tests whether you’re ready to take the test.” Prior to HB7069, progress monitoring was required to assess reading skills of all K-3 students. Additionally, after third grade, progress monitoring was required for any student scoring a level 1 or 2 on a state assessment. In many districts, ALL students were progress monitored, regardless of FCAT/FSA score AND K-3 students were often progress monitored in Math in addition to the required progress monitoring in reading.

The use of standardized testing in K-3 students is problematic to begin with, ignoring developmental differences amongst our youngest learners and focusing the classroom on structured academic learning rather than more effective and developmentally appropriate play based learning. In general, standardized tests are considered invalid and unreliable for children under 8 (read more here, here and here).

Section 2 of HB7069 (Section 1002.20, F.S.) deleted the requirement that each elementary school regularly assess the reading ability of each K-3 student. This was good news and could have eliminated almost ALL of the standardized testing in K-3. Districts were still required to monitor students who were not meeting the performance requirements, but surely qualified teachers could have identified those children in need of intervention.

Sadly, our “littles” continue to be tested and retested in ways that are not developmentally appropriate and, more than likely, are harmful. Where are the districts that took the opportunity HB7069 offered and eliminated standardized progress monitoring in their K-3 classrooms? My own county (Monroe) continues to progress monitor all K-3 students in Reading and Math, using computer based standardized testing. (read more about the inappropriateness and unreliability of computer based testing in small children here).

Instead of requiring progress monitoring for all students (section 1008.25.20, F.S), districts were given three options for monitoring students who were “not meeting the school district or state requirements for satisfactory performance” or did not score a level 3 on a state standardized assessment. Any such student must be covered by one of the following plans:

  • A federally required student plan such as an individual education plan (IEP);
  • A schoolwide system of progress monitoring for all students, except a student who scores Level 4 or above in the specific subject area statewide assessment may be exempted from participation by the principal; or
  • An individual progress monitoring plan.

Districts could have chosen to individualize the progress monitoring plan, dramatically decreasing the amount of standardized testing for many students. Sadly, many (if not all) districts have chosen plan “B”: monitor ALL students in Math and Reading, whether they need it, or not.

Eliminate Prescriptive Remediation / Intensive Reading:

Prior to HB 7069, the state required that any student scoring a 1 or 2 on state assessments must be enrolled in remedial courses.  This led to the uncomfortable situation of students being enrolled in both Advanced Placement English Literature and Intensive Reading, at the same time.  The mandated remedial courses, also, meant many struggling students lost their electives to remediation.

Sections 3 and 4 of HB 7069 (Section 1003.4156, F.S. and 1003.4282, F.S.) eliminated the requirement for middle and high school students scoring Level 1 or 2 on state testing to automatically be enrolled in a remedial course. The decision to provide remedial courses is now supposed to be a local decision.

Section 9 of HB 7069 (section 1008.25, F.S.) discussed the use of “support” as opposed to remediation: “each student who does not achieve a Level 3 (satisfactory) or above on a statewide, standardized assessment must be evaluated to determine the nature of the student’s difficulty, the areas of academic need, and strategies for providing academic support to improve the student’s performance.”

So, mandatory remediation is no longer required and placement in remedial courses is now a district decision. Still, in many districts, students continue to be placed in remedial courses primarily, and sometimes entirely, based on test scores. My county, chose to use progress monitoring data to identify students in need of remediation, even, in some cases, where the teacher did not, or would not, recommend that child for such interventions. Why not return these decisions to the classroom teacher, who would surely be better at determining “the nature of the student’s difficulty, the areas of academic need, and strategies for providing academic support to improve the student’s performance” than a test score?

Flexibility in District created final exams:

Perhaps, the biggest outcry over testing during the 2014-15 school year was the unfunded state mandate that required districts to create common final exams for all grades and all subjects, including Kindergarten art class and 1st grade PE, with test results to be used, in part, to evaluate teachers. The requirement for district finals in all grades and all subjects was a requirement of SB736. Called the “Student Success Act,” SB736 also mandated the use of test scores in teacher evaluations (more about VAM below) and was passed in 2011, as a prerequisite to obtaining Race To The Top funding.     SB736 was the first bill Governor Scott signed after taking office.

Section 7 of HB 7069  (Section 1008.22 F.S.) eliminated SB 736’s requirement for “all grades, all subject” district created final exams. This should have allowed districts to return to teacher created final exams in most situations. Sadly, many districts are continuing to use and develop new district final exams in non-state tested subjects. District created midterms are not uncommon and some districts have created common 9 week assessments.

Why, when given the opportunity, didn’t districts choose to move towards other methods of measuring student performance? The initial mandate allowed for performance or portfolio assessments, but districts still seem to be moving toward multiple choice, common midterms and finals for many of their middle and high school courses. Why not use teacher created exams, performance assessments or portfolios? When teachers create the assessment, children are tested on what has been taught. When districts create the assessment, teachers must teach what will be tested and the results become as much of an assessment of the teacher as the student.

Why Is there Still So Much Testing?

HB7069 appears to have returned the responsibility of progress monitoring, remediation and final exams to the districts. School Boards were given the opportunity to dramatically decrease the amount of testing in their districts. They could choose to eliminate standardized testing in K-3. They could choose to individualize progress monitoring for their struggling students and eliminate it for the rest. They could choose individual teacher created final exams.

Or could they?

Screen Shot 2016-06-15 at 7.48.04 AM

Near the end of their FOIL presentation on HB 7069, the FLDOE described their “opportunity”: “To reclaim the powerful potential of VAM to support leaders in making data-driven decisions that support student learning and educator growth.” VAM (or Value Added Model) is a formula designed to evaluate teachers based on student test scores. Rarely are teacher created assessments or decisions included in “data-driven decisions.”

The use of VAM in teacher evaluations is one of education reformer’s favorite ideas, despite the fact that the method has been discredited by multiple studies (here, here, and here) and, frankly, defies common sense. Steven Klees, professor University of Maryland, wrote:

“The bottom line is that regardless of technical sophistication, the use of VAM is never [and, perhaps never will be] ‘accurate, reliable, and valid’ and will never yield ‘rigorously supported inferences” as expected and desired.”

In this 3 minute video, Stanford Professor Emeritus, Edward Haertel, further explains the flaws of using Value-Added Models for teacher assessment.

Teachers harmed by their VAM scores are beginning to sue. In May, a judge in New York found in favor of fourth-grade teacher Sheri G. Lederman, calling the state’s use of VAM in her evaluation “arbitrary” and “capricious.” Similar cases are popping up across the country.

Why continue to use such a controversial and discredited method of teacher evaluation? Who benefits? The answer may be as simple as following the money.

The design and implementation of VAM in Florida Public schools was contracted to American Institutes for Research or AIR (the same company that later won the bid to create the new FSA). The initial contract of almost $4M and millions more for annual “maintenance”  fees per this long term contract.

I was, personally, surprised to discover that the “VAM formula” had annual maintenance fees. Floridians are spending massive amounts of tax payer money, annually, on a flawed formula that has essentially been discredited and has been declared arbitrary and capricious in a court of law. The FLDOE should expect to pay even more tax dollars defending against the VAM lawsuits that are sure to come. Paying vendors excessive amounts tax dollars on unproven, or disproven, education policies in the name of “Accountability”? Sounds like education “reform” at work…

The AIR representative for the coordination of VAM contract, which led to the development of Florida’s Value Added Model, was Christy Hovanetz, who served as Contract Manager. Prior to working for AIR, Ms. Hovanetz served as the Assistant Deputy Commissioner of the FLDOE. Ms. Hovanetz now works as a Senior Policy Fellow at Jeb Bush’s Foundation for Excellence in Education (FEE). Not surprisingly, the FEE’s Florida affiliate, Foundation for Florida’s Future (FFF) applauded the initial implementation of VAM, stating “This model will transform Florida’s historic law into a powerful tool to raise the quality of public education and establish the Sunshine State as a national model for teacher quality.”

It should come as no surprise to anyone that Jeb Bush and his Foundations have had unprecedented influence on Florida education policy, apparently without regards to costs. The state’s continued allegiance to VAM is a perfect example of that influence. One often wonders why Florida would continue to promote questionable policies and fund flawed practices, essentially ignoring the research data to the contrary and often defying even common sense (I’m looking at you, and your “Best and Brightest” bill, Erik Fresen). You don’t have to look too far to understand that the policy makers have been more interested in keeping Jeb, and perhaps his investor friends, happy than doing what was right for the public school children in Florida. Senator Gaetz said as much to Politico reporter, Jessica Bakeman:

Reflecting on the bill’s fate during the session that ended in March, Gaetz, a term-limited Niceville Republican, said House Republicans resisted changes because of their loyalty to Bush. But he argued they were wrong to assume Bush would oppose his plan.

  To read the full article, click here.

Who benefits from VAM? Test developers, like AIR, (and their investors) who profit from the formula’s use as well as the tests needed to provide the data, and education reformers, like former Gov. Bush, who can use the data to further the narrative that public schools are failing and teachers are to blame. With Gov. Bush back in charge of the FEE, parents will have an even more difficult time being heard.

So, herein lies the problem: If the purpose of progress monitoring, remediation and common finals is to collect data for VAM and other data-driven decisions, and the FLDOE wanted to use this opportunity to “reclaim” VAM’s potential, then HB7069 was a sham. Legislators, bombarded with concerns about over testing, were convinced to vote for a bill that merely shifted the blame for over testing from the state to the districts and maintained the data collection requirements needed to sustain the use of VAM. HB7069 made it possible for Tallahassee to say “we have given control back to the districts” while districts understand the truth behind that illusion.  State mandates continue to force districts to comply with data-driven accountability mandates, leaving little room for true local control. Under constant threats of decreased funding, districts focus all their efforts on maintaining compliance.

To be fair, HB7069 did eliminate the 11th grade FSA ELA, before it was ever administered, and the mandatory administration of the PERT assessment, previously given in 11th grade. It also placed a limit on state and district testing at 5%, or a ridiculously high 45 hours per year (yet no system was set up to monitor that and few, if any, districts had to reduce testing to get in under the bar). The bill also reduced the use of test scores in teacher’s evaluation from 50% to 33%. These components may be admirable, but they do little to lessen the real impact of high stakes testing on our kids.

In the end, parents complained about excessive testing and Tallahassee responded by shifting the blame to the districts; which is ironic when the bill was titled “An act relating to education accountability.” Who is accountable for the over-testing problems in Florida’s public schools? If you ask Tallahassee, who created the policies, the answer appears to be “not me.”

Parents are tired of laws that promise change but don’t deliver. Ignoring research data and continuing to pay millions for failed programs like VAM is not true accountability. Blaming others for the consequences of your own policies, by passing sham laws like HB7069, makes a mockery of the word “accountability.” Enough is enough. We are AGAIN asking for a full review of the accountability system in Florida.

And this time we suggest listening to someone besides just Jeb!